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Introducing... The Adams Axial
#21
Nice runs quieter than anything I ever built. Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
So by switching you mean the bottom runs, top generates, then reverse?
If so does the generating side put out more than the motoring side?
Ultimately that is what your trying to achieve right?
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#22
(03-24-2024, 02:57 AM)Shylo Wrote: Nice runs quieter than anything I ever built. Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
So by switching you mean the bottom runs, top generates, then reverse?
If so does the generating side put out more than the motoring side?
Ultimately that is what your trying to achieve right?
Thanks. It's capable of whisper quiet, just not today Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
In the first video I'm switching each coil set independently from the same source.
In the second one, I'm switch all 12 coils (sets in parallel) from the bottom switch.
The trick is to now to alternatively switch all 12 coils from the top.
That way, I'll have 144 individual coils fire every revolution.
Driving one side and generating on the other has seen 18v/80v but that costs a little bit of current, and doesn't give you back as much.

Further testing and tuning today has the input down to 30V @ 60-80mA, 25 ohm load, ~900rpm.

Motor or generator or both ? There's a lot of energy to still harvest from EMF, and depending how I do the rotor, it may be a generator too.
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#23
Getting back to work on this - I have the generator coils wired for 3 phase @ ~30V per phase, and can use them to pulse static coils on the bench.

The thing I haven't been able to do now becomes possible.

As I'm using Neo's, I've never been able to get them close enough to the coils to elicit the big negative pulse that Adams spoke of. And funny enough, I'm back on this after taking a look at Floyd Sweets VTA - only to see that Robert Adams was referenced with regards to how his device worked.

So, to achieve that big negative kick when you open a powered circuit, I am hoping a switch between the Axial generator coils, and a static bifilar coil sitting on the bench, with a 1mm plastic washer separating the coil and the Neo magnet will create the necessary conditions.

It was also mentioned by Adams that 110-120V is where you would normally start with Neo magnets...
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#24
Adams was a big proponent of the physical commutator.  If I recall, he may have even said recovering the spike with electronics is a no-go.  Others argue that statement I'm aware.

Not sure if this helps, but here is my Adams build a few years ago with a commutator.  If I remember, the back-spike was impressive.

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#25
Nice, thanks for the inspiration, I'll have to get started on a commutator!

I'm taking it a step further by wanting to switch the generator coil to a parallel connected bifilar coil which should give me a kick on both coils when the switch opens.
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#26
Whale Oil Beef Hooked

I've bent three little pieces of 1mm copper wire over a small perspex disc, sandwiched between two washers and bolted it to the shaft... it's the start of a commutator.

Testing with one phase of generator coils (2) switching to a 4 ohm bifilar coil with the secondaries on a meter, I've found that CEMF disappears or is completely dwarfed by flyback when you get the timing just right.

With one lead on the commutator washer, I've slowly made my way around the edge of the commutator with the other lead. Lots of CEMF, which spikes and then becomes negative just as you approach the point where the rotor magnet is over the coil. Timing this couldn't be easier now.

The negative spike was a sustained -500 to -800V and the sparks are getting much bigger now.

Lots of re-construction to do now, before taking this even further.
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#27
Commutator is coming together enough to make a quick video.

I was lucky enough to buy brushes that fit perfectly inside a 10mm tube of aluminium.

There's only two mags on the rotor, so I'm just circling around one side getting a feel for the mechanical switch. 

Just as the rotor is approaching the two coils wired to the bifilar, the voltage flips to negative, and the sparks start to pick up. You can also hear how it affects the motor rpm speed when the tuning is too advanced or retarded.





Edit: A little more testing, and I'm definitely pulling some current now. Holding a 20mmx20mm magnet over the bifilar coil, I've found a zone where the voltage is negative and the magnet is being pulsed hard despite finding twice as much negative voltage in other spots. The sparks can be stretched to 4-5mm, but this might be partly carbon build up starting to short after a long run.
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