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Current Flowing in 2 Directions in 1 Wire
#1
Bug 
I have done several tests and I think the information presented here is correct.

Current from 2 sources CAN flow in opposite directions (or any direction) within 1 single wire.  I will share my first video here now.

  

I have already tried DC/DC, AC/AC, DC/AC and different phases.  It matters not- seems any phase can occupy the same space as another phase. As long as the sources are isolated.

I am now onto breaking that center pipe and installing devices between it.  Also trying to see if it is possible to induce with the combined pipe and direct the CEMF somewhere useful.

There are all sorts of possibilities once you wrap your mind around what is occurring.  If you think this conclusion is in error- please tell me so I can upload additional videos that may dispel doubts.
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#2
So check this out..  I cut a coil in the single pipe that is carrying two DC currents opposite ways.

When the load is these 12V Edison LED bulbs, and it is set at the right voltages, the coil produces Alternating Current in the single pipe line..

I tried to repeat it with resistors instead of bulbs, but it will not happen.  So far only with these bulbs.  I am not sure if it is some form of resonance happening, or what.  

If it is resonance, we now have a resonating AC circuit that requires No Switching...  And ONLY DC Input. Hmmm...



BTW-  I watch these bulbs on the scope, from 1V to 12V hooked up to the same supply, and the input is flat DC the whole way.
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#3
If it is resonance, we now have a resonating AC circuit that requires No Switching... And ONLY DC Input. Hmmm...
we need an 'AC' type of signal from a battery to run the LG
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#4
(04-25-2024, 06:40 PM)MerLynn Wrote: If it is resonance, we now have a resonating AC circuit that requires No Switching...  And ONLY DC Input. Hmmm...
we need an 'AC' type of signal from a battery to run the LG

Yea, with switching.  Whether it be a brush, relay, transistor, they all require switching.
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#5
Replace the inductor with a resistor and the AC stops.  The effect is being caused from the reactive nature of the coil combined with 2 currents flowing in the same wire in opposite directions.

When 1 current gets ahold, the coil reacts trying to oppose the field and sends counter EMF to squelch it. But this allows the other source current to become dominant, so the coil switches direction and tries to oppose that one, and it repeats.

Quite interesting!  I need to see if I can get it to occur with anything other than these LED bulbs
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#6
(04-25-2024, 06:59 PM)Jim Mac Wrote: Replace the inductor with a resistor and the AC stops.  The effect is being caused from the reactive nature of the coil combined with 2 currents flowing in the same wire in opposite directions.

When 1 current gets ahold, the coil reacts trying to oppose the field and sends counter EMF to squelch it. But this allows the other source current to become dominant, so the coil switches direction and tries to oppose that one, and it repeats.

Quite interesting!  I need to see if I can get it to occur with anything other than these LED bulbs

Thanks for helping this make sense Jim. Have you tried two AC sources over the one wire?
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#7
(04-25-2024, 07:18 PM)unimmortal Wrote:
(04-25-2024, 06:59 PM)Jim Mac Wrote: Replace the inductor with a resistor and the AC stops.  The effect is being caused from the reactive nature of the coil combined with 2 currents flowing in the same wire in opposite directions.

When 1 current gets ahold, the coil reacts trying to oppose the field and sends counter EMF to squelch it. But this allows the other source current to become dominant, so the coil switches direction and tries to oppose that one, and it repeats.

Quite interesting!  I need to see if I can get it to occur with anything other than these LED bulbs

Thanks for helping this make sense Jim. Have you tried two AC sources over the one wire?

Yea, I did square waves 90 degrees out of phase.  They occupy the same wire fine.  And the phase in the middle of the pipe is a combination of the two, the center device will have merged wave while the 2 outside loads stay pure.

I showed before that 2 same direction currents of different potentials can also occupy the same wire. It seems, as long as the currents are from isolated sources, they stay in their own channel within the wire.  But things put into that combined part experience the effects from both circuits.

Now if we create that resonant oscillation with an inductor, as soon as we harvest from the inductor the effect starts to stop, because the secondary tries to cancel the alternating field that is causing the fields to oscillate in the first place.
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#8
(04-25-2024, 07:43 PM)Jim Mac Wrote: Now if we create that resonant oscillation with an inductor, as soon as we harvest from the inductor the effect starts to stop, because the secondary tries to cancel the alternating field that is causing the fields to oscillate in the first place.

I just can't seem to get this. 

Taking one of my 6 magnet rotors and rotating it over 6 coils that are wired as two separate circuits (3 in series + 3 in series), will induce two separate alternating circuits. Taking one end of each circuit and connecting into a single wire will combine the two ... all good so far ... what do we do with the other end of these alternating circuits? 

I'm trying to leave out power and just use induction to keep things simple until I get it.
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#9
(04-25-2024, 08:37 PM)unimmortal Wrote:
(04-25-2024, 07:43 PM)Jim Mac Wrote: Now if we create that resonant oscillation with an inductor, as soon as we harvest from the inductor the effect starts to stop, because the secondary tries to cancel the alternating field that is causing the fields to oscillate in the first place.

I just can't seem to get this. 

Taking one of my 6 magnet rotors and rotating it over 6 coils that are wired as two separate circuits (3 in series + 3 in series), will induce two separate alternating circuits. Taking one end of each circuit and connecting into a single wire will combine the two ... all good so far ... what do we do with the other end of these alternating circuits? 

I'm trying to leave out power and just use induction to keep things simple until I get it.

I have no info about inducing yet, and I can only get the oscillating effect with those exact bulbs. I tried with car 12V incandescent bulbs and can't get it into self oscillation


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#10
(04-25-2024, 08:49 PM)Jim Mac Wrote: I have no info about inducing yet, and I can only get the oscillating effect with those exact bulbs. I tried with car 12V incandescent bulbs and can't get it into self oscillation

Aren't LEDs unidirectional?

I'll shortly have a way of testing single wire connections and polyphase with 4 induced AC sources to iteract with DC (or AC Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images. ) drive coils. I intend to crack this nut!
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